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Prints and Paintings of Clamdigging by Carol Thompson

 

    Good Eatin' Tonight (pastel, prints on paper and canvas) Counting Clams (pastel, prints on paper and canvas) Clamming Under The Sun (pastel, prints on paper and canvas) Clam Diggers Dance (pastel, prints on paper and canvas) Clamming And Fishing At Sunset (pastel, prints on paper and canvas) Three Bags Full (pastel, prints on paper and canvas)
  Father And Daughter (pastel, prints on paper and canvas) Digging After Dark (pastel, prints on paper and canvas) Clamming Weather (pastel, prints on paper and canvas) It's A Family Thing (pastel, prints on paper and canvas) Training Session (pastel, prints on paper and canvas) A Good Day For Clamming (pastel, prints on paper and canvas) Clamdiggers At Sunset (pastel, prints on paper and canvas) Ladies Looking For Clams (pastel, prints on paper and canvas) Night Dig (gouache, prints on paper and canvas)  
  Lone Clamdiggers (pastel, prints on paper and canvas) A Serious Clammer (pastel, prints on paper and canvas) Clamdiggers In The Fog (pastel, prints on paper and canvas) Digging For Clams (gouache, prints on paper and canvas) Clamming In The Bay (gouache, prints on paper and canvas)
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About Clamdigging

"I'm an artist. I'm also a clamdigger (for more than 40 years). So it seems painting scenes of clam digging on the Oregon and Washington coast (near where I live and dig) would be a natural subject for me. I choose to use pastel on textured paper as well as gouache on watercolor paper for my mediums and substrates. I look for the unusual when developing a composition; I like to capture the different styles of 'getting the clams'. Some diggers use clam shovels and are seen on one knee and up to their shoulder in the sand, There are squatter's, who use a clam gun to pull the clam out of the sand. There are pro's and novices. Some diggers are alone, others with a group of friends, or family. Some bring their dogs. The variations seem limitless.

In addition to getting the clams, I think the other reasons I paint this activity is because of the variety of people, their gear, the weather, and the camaraderie. It seems as though a couple of hours before low tide, an empty beach can turn into a bustling crowd of people, dogs, and cars. I'm there with clam gun and camera looking for that clamhole and a great composition for my next painting. Speaking of the weather, clamdiggers are out in beautiful clear sunny weather as well as beautiful blustery rainy days. If the dig is at night, they carry lanterns and flashlights to find the holes that signify a clam is present. A night dig is truly a sight worth seeing.

Razor clams are generally under 6 inches long. The outer shell is a yellowish-brown with a glossy white inner shell. They subsist on plankton filtered from the surrounding sea water. They are called razor clams because they resemble an old-fashioned barbers straight-edged razor. And they are tasty fried, baked, or in chowder."

© 2013 Carol Thompson