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Q. How long have you been painting?
A. All my life.  I started drawing as a child and received my first oil painting set for Christmas when my oldest son was four years old.

Q. Did you go to art school?
A. No. I took lessons and workshops from artists whose work I admired and wanted to emulate.  I acquired art books from the public library and soaked up the information in them.

Q. How did you learn to paint seascapes?
A. I sought out seascape painters and took classes from them.  Once I learned the basics, I studied the ocean every time I had an opportunity to go to the beach.

Q. How do you decide what to paint?
A. I paint what I love....what I am excited about!  First and always it is the ocean.  Lately, I've been painting a variety of subjects:  street scenes, people, (especially children), Americana, farmlands and animals, flowers...If it  "grabs" me, it gets painted.

Q.Where and when do you work?
A.I have a terrific loft above my bedroom.  It is quiet and has great light.  I usually start my day at eight a.m., work until lunch, and back to work at one p.m.  By three p.m., I am "creatively exhausted", so I go to any of the many follow-up tasks that go along with my career.

Q.How long does it take to do a painting?
A. Depending on the size of the oil canvas, anywhere from three days to three months, or a year.  I always have a blank canvas ready for the in-between times while waiting for a piece to dry to a certain degree.

Q. Do you fit your watercolors, gouache and pastel paintings in those times?
A. Yes.  I also take time to paint 'en plein aire' on location or to demonstrate at public appearances, and speak to various art organizations.

Q.You have a large selection of  limited edition giclée and photolithograph prints.  First, what is a giclée print?
A.Giclée (say: "shee clay " ) is a French word meaning "to spurt" or "to spray forcefully".  It is done on an ink jet printer with water soluable inks in four colors.

Q.How do you make giclée prints?
A. I have a room in my basement set up with computers, printers and all the supplies I need to make my own giclee prints.  The process is long and involved:  from photographing or scanning the artwork, to color correcting, stripping, printing and  trimming to signing and packaging them, and finally the distribution of the finished print.

Q.How many prints do you do?
A. Edition lengths vary from 500 to 3500, depending on the image size and subject of the print.  I have available, right now, over 300 different images: some giclees and some photolithographs. The photolithographs are done by an outside print shop and I get the entire edition (usually 3000 plus 100 artists proofs) done at one time.  The giclées, I do myself  "in house" and can do one at a time as an order comes in.  All of my new prints are giclées.

Q.What is an artists proof?
A. An artists proof (or proofs) is generally 1/10th of the entire edition.  In my case I limit the proofs to only 100 prints.  In the old days, the printer pulled from the machinery approximately every tenth print to check for color and quality.  The artist was on hand to "proof" these sheets.  The accepted policy is that these proofs are marked A/P by the artist and numbered and given to museums or galleries or dealers as gifts.  Any remaining of the ten percent can be sold by the artist at his/her discretion.
 


Any questions or comments can be addressed to FAQ@carolthompson.com

© 2002 Carol Thompson